January 2009

These are the books the Children's Area staff reviewed in January 2009. Click on the "check the catalog" link to see if the book is available. If it isn't, ask a librarian to put it on hold for you.

Scroll past these book reviews to see an archive of all of the previous book reviews.

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Thump, Quack, Moo : A Wacky Adventure

  • by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin
  • Call number: JE CRONIN
  • check the catalog
  • Recommended for ages: 4-8

The barnyard is busy again! Farmer Brown is getting ready for the annual Corn Maze Festival. His big surprise will be a Statue of Liberty Corn Maze. Farmer Brown has recruited the cows, chickens, and Duck to help him get ready. What will happen when he gives each of the chickens a hammer, each of the cows a paintbrush, and gives Duck orders to build a ticket booth for the hot air balloon ride. Read and see what happens, and what SURPRISE Duck has for Farmer Brown and the annual Corn Maze Festival.

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The End of the Beginning: Being the Adventures of a Small Snail (And an Even Smaller Ant)

Avi has created a charming, and incredibly witty account of Avon the snail’s search to find the excitement that he has been missing in his life. Accompanied by his new, best friend Edward the ant, Avon sets off on his first great adventure. As the two travel down the branch that they live on, they encounter a plethora of new friends that help add to the excitement of their journey. This book is chock full of slap-stick humor and word play which makes it enjoyable for readers of all ages.

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Yoko

Yoko by Rosemary Wells is the story of a young cat from Japan who struggles to adjust to living in the United States. The one place where Yoko struggles the most to fit in is at her school. She feels very uncomfortable there and is teased because she is different. At lunch time Yoko eats sushi. None of the other students in Yoko's class eat sushi. In fact, they find eating seaweed to be unimaginably nasty. The other students' constant teasing brings Yoko great sadness, but her mother does her best to ease her daughter's woes. She makes sushi for Yoko to share with the class. And eventually, new friendships develop, and it is from this first friendship that Yoko begins to feel comfortable at school and learns to cherish her Asian heritage.

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