July 2009

These are the books the Children's Area staff reviewed in July 2009. Click on the "check the catalog" link to see if the book is available. If it isn't, ask a librarian to put it on hold for you.

Scroll past these book reviews to see an archive of all of the previous book reviews.

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Silverwing

This is the first book that I have read by Kenneth Oppel, and it serves as a wonderful introduction to the Silverwing trilogy. In fact, his next book will be the first release that I have anticipated since the release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows! Silverwing tells the story of Shade, a young silverwing bat, who is the runt of his colony. It chronicles his first migration and all of the obstacles that he encounters during his epic journey. Silverwing is a beautifully crafted, fun to read narrative of heroism. Older readers will enjoy this book, and the best part is, if they do they can continue on with the rest of the series.

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Number The Stars

In 1940, the small country of Denmark was occupied by Nazi Germany. The occupation lasted for five years; during which time the Danish people suffered greatly. Regardless of their suffering, the Danes continued to resist their oppressors throughout the course of the war. Number the Stars recounts this resistance in the fictitious tale of ten year old Annemarie. Her story chronicles the events surrounding the successful smuggling of nearly 7,000 Jewish people out of Demark and into Sweden before they were sent to the Nazi concentration camps. This Newberry Award winning book by Lois Lowry is a truly powerful book that will surely leave a lasting impression.

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Roscoe Riley Rules #1: Never Glue Your Friends to Chairs

Roscoe Riley is a first grader who has a knack for getting into trouble. Don't get me wrong, he's a good kid and all, but sometimes his good intentions go sorely awry. In this book, for instance, the author opens with our protagonist, Roscoe sitting in timeout. Now why is he in timeout? Well, I can't tell you that, it would ruin the book...however, the title does hint at it (HEAVILY). This is a light read, and great for kids who are looking for something that is really accessible and playful. The best part is, if you like Roscoe, you can read more about him because there are seven books in the series.

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BearWalker

Being a member of the Mohawk Bear Clan hasn't helped young Baron face the difficulties of being the shortest boy in his eighth grade class. Though well versed in Indian traditions and folklore, Baron is completely ignorant when it comes to defending himself against class bullies. While having to face them everyday at school is bad enough, things get worse when the whole class goes on an overnight camping trip. That's right, twenty-four hours of uninterrupted bullying. On the first night, campers share scary bear stories. However, they soon discover that scary stories are the least of their problems. When the camp counselors reveal their real plans for the kids, it doesn't take long for Baron to discover that something is wrong, very wrong. You’ll have to read this one to find out how the shortest boy in class manages to save the day.

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