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After The End Adult Book Discussion Group

Meets the 1st Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m. at the Athens-Clarke County Library (or virtually)

"This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper." - T. S. Eliot

The world has ended? What's not to love? We know it's not really over. There is still a story to tell. Sometimes it's a story about how the end came; sometimes it's a story of those who survive. If you enjoy these explorations, you will enjoy AFTER THE END, book discussion group dedicated to Post-Apocalyptic fiction and the readers who love it. Questions? Contact Gretchen Elm at gelm@athenslibrary.org or 706-613-3650 ext. 324.


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After The End Adult Book Discussion Group - Athens

Book Choices for the Year

Here are the books (chosen by attendees at our July 2021 meeting) that our book group will be reading for the rest of the year: link.

Please plan to join us at our July 2022 meeting to choose next years' books.

The Apocalypse Seven with Virtual Author Visit

Thursday, November 4, 2021 at 7pm

Hybrid meeting - choose Zoom or in person in Multipurpose Room C

Join us as we discuss The Apocalypse Seven by Gene Doucette with a special virtual visit from the author! Newcomers are always welcome. 

Put a copy on hold through PINES here.

About the book from Goodreads: Scott Sigler called Doucette’s cozy apocalypse story, “entertaining as hell.” Come see how the world ends, not with a bang, but a whatever...

The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. It doesn’t explain how the city became overgrown with vegetation in the space of a night. Or how wild animals with no fear of humans came to roam the streets.

Add freakish weather to the mix, swings of temperature that spawn tornadoes one minute and snowstorms the next, and it seems things can’t get much weirder. Yet even as a handful of new survivors appear—Paul, a preacher as quick with a gun as a Bible verse; Win, a young professional with a horse; Bethany, a thirteen-year-old juvenile delinquent; and Ananda, an MIT astrophysics adjunct—life in Cambridge, Massachusetts gets stranger and stranger.

The self-styled Apocalypse Seven are tired of questions with no answers. Tired of being hunted by things seen and unseen. Now, armed with curiosity, desperation, a shotgun, and a bow, they become the hunters. And that’s when things truly get weird. 

Contact Gretchen Elm at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 706-613-3650 ext. 324 for more information or the link to join the meeting.

Need help?

The Memory Police

world war z cover

Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 7pm

Hybrid meeting - choose Zoom or in person in Multi-purpose room C

Join us as we discuss The Memory Police Yoko Ogawa! Newcomers are always welcome. 

About the book from Goodreads: On an unnamed island off an unnamed coast, objects are disappearing: first hats, then ribbons, birds, roses—until things become much more serious. Most of the island's inhabitants are oblivious to these changes, while those few imbued with the power to recall the lost objects live in fear of the draconian Memory Police, who are committed to ensuring that what has disappeared remains forgotten.

When a young woman who is struggling to maintain her career as a novelist discovers that her editor is in danger from the Memory Police, she concocts a plan to hide him beneath her floorboards. As fear and loss close in around them, they cling to her writing as the last way of preserving the past.

A surreal, provocative fable about the power of memory and the trauma of loss, The Memory Police is a stunning new work from one of the most exciting contemporary authors writing in any language.

Contact Gretchen Elm at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 706-613-3650 ext. 324 for more information or the link to join the meeting.

Need help?

World War Z

world war z cover

Thursday, September 2, 2021 at 7pm

Hybrid meeting - choose Zoom or in person in Multi-purpose room C

Join us as we discuss World War Z by Max Brooks! Newcomers are always welcome. 

About the book from Goodreads: The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and inhospitable areas of the planet. He recorded the testimony of men, women, and sometimes children who came face-to-face with the living, or at least the undead, hell of that dreadful time. World War Z is the result. Never before have we had access to a document that so powerfully conveys the depth of fear and horror, and also the ineradicable spirit of resistance, that gripped human society through the plague years.

Ranging from the now infamous village of New Dachang in the United Federation of China, where the epidemiological trail began with the twelve-year-old Patient Zero, to the unnamed northern forests where untold numbers sought a terrible and temporary refuge in the cold, to the United States of Southern Africa, where the Redeker Plan provided hope for humanity at an unspeakable price, to the west-of-the-Rockies redoubt where the North American tide finally started to turn, this invaluable chronicle reflects the full scope and duration of the Zombie War.

Most of all, the book captures with haunting immediacy the human dimension of this epochal event. Facing the often raw and vivid nature of these personal accounts requires a degree of courage on the part of the reader, but the effort is invaluable because, as Mr. Brooks says in his introduction, "By excluding the human factor, aren't we risking the kind of personal detachment from history that may, heaven forbid, lead us one day to repeat it? And in the end, isn't the human factor the only true difference between us and the enemy we now refer to as 'the living dead'?"

Note: Some of the numerical and factual material contained in this edition was previously published under the auspices of the United Nations Postwar Commission.

Contact Gretchen Elm at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 706-613-3650 ext. 324 for more information or the link to join the meeting.

Need help?