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After The End Adult Book Discussion Group

Meets the 1st Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m.
At the Athens-Clarke County Library

"This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper." - T. S. Eliot

The world has ended? What's not to love? We know it's not really over. There is still a story to tell. Sometimes it's a story about how the end came; sometimes it's a story of those who survive. If you enjoy these explorations, you will enjoy AFTER THE END, book discussion group dedicated to Post-Apocalyptic fiction and the readers who love it. Questions? Contact Eddie Whitlock, ewhitlock@athenslibrary.org.


Never Let Me Go

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Thursday, September 6, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro:

In one of the most acclaimed novels of recent years, Kazuo Ishiguro imagines the lives of a group of students growing up in a darkly skewed version of contemporary England. Narrated by Kathy, now thirty-one, Never Let Me Go dramatises her attempts to come to terms with her childhood at the seemingly idyllic Hailsham School and with the fate that has always awaited her and her closest friends in the wider world. A story of love, friendship and memory, Never Let Me Go is charged throughout with a sense of the fragility of life. - Publisher


Upcoming Selections

The Gone World

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Thursday, August 2, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch: 1997. Shannon Moss is part of a clandestine division within the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. In Pennsylvania she is assigned to solve the murder of a Navy SEAL's family and locate his vanished teenage daughter. The SEAL was an astronaut aboard the spaceship U.S.S. Libra-- a ship assumed lost to the currents of Deep Time. Moss believes the SEAL's experience with time travel, and his knowledge of the future, has triggered this violence. She travels ahead in time to explore possible versions of the future, and discovers that it's not only the fate of a family that hinges on her work: hurtling toward the present is the Terminus, the terrifying and cataclysmic end of humanity itself. - Publisher

Borne

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Thursday, June 7, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Borne by Jeff VanderMeer: In a ruined, nameless city of the future, Rachel makes her living as a scavenger. She finds a creature she names Borne entangled in the fur of Mord, a gigantic despotic bear that once prowled the corridors of a biotech firm, the Company, until he was experimented on, grew large, learned to fly, and broke free. Made insane by the company's torture of him, Mord terrorizes the city even as he provides sustenance for scavengers. At first, Borne looks like nothing at all--just a green lump that might be a discard from the Company, which, although severely damaged, is rumored to still make creatures and send them to far-distant places that have not yet suffered collapse. Borne reminds Rachel of the island nation of her birth, now long lost to rising seas. She feels an attachment that she resents: attachments are traps, and in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet when she takes Borne to her subterranean sanctuary, Rachel convinces her lover, Wick--a special kind of dealer--not to render down Borne as raw genetic material for the drugs he sells. But nothing is quite the way it seems: not the past, not the present, not the future. If Wick is hiding secrets, so is Rachel--and Borne most of all. What Rachel finds hidden deep within the Company will change everything and everyone. There, lost and forgotten things have lingered and grown. What they have grown into is mighty indeed. - Publisher

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

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Thursday, May 3, 2018, 7:00 p.m.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick: THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results. - Publisher