Last Monday Book Discussion Group

Meets the Last Monday of each month at 7 p.m.
At the Athens-Clarke County Library

Love discussing literature, plays, and poetry? Join us for in depth discussions of literature, plays, and poetry the last Monday of every month. If you are interested in joining please email ashull@athenslibrary.org or call (706) 613-3650 ext 358.

King Lear

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Monday, April 25, 7:00 p.m.

King Lear by William Shakespeare: King Lear is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare. It depicts the gradual descent into madness of the title character, after he disposes of his kingdom giving bequests to two of his three daughters based on their flattery of him, bringing tragic consequences for all. Derived from the legend of Leir of Britain, a mythological pre-Roman Celtic king, the play has been widely adapted for the stage and motion pictures, with the title role coveted by many of the world's most accomplished actors. - Wikipedia

From Death to Morning

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Monday, March 28, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m

In Multipurpose Room C

From Death to Morning by Thomas Wolfe: Thomas Clayton Wolfe (October 3, 1900 – September 15, 1938) was an American novelist of the early twentieth century. Wolfe wrote four lengthy novels, plus many short stories, dramatic works and novellas. He is known for mixing highly original, poetic, rhapsodic, and impressionistic prose with autobiographical writing. His books, written and published from the 1920s to the 1940s, vividly reflect on American culture and the mores of that period, albeit filtered through Wolfe's sensitive, sophisticated and hyper-analytical perspective. He became widely known during his own lifetime.

After Wolfe's death, his contemporary William Faulkner said that Wolfe may have had the best talent of their generation. Wolfe's influence extends to the writings of beat generation writer Jack Kerouac, and of authors Ray Bradbury and Philip Roth, among others. He remains an important writer in modern American literature, as one of the first masters of autobiographical fiction, and is considered North Carolina's most famous writer. - Wikipedia

Lamb in his Bosom

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Monday, February 29, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m

In Multipurpose Room C

Lamb in his Bosom by Caroline Miller: In 1934, Caroline Miller's novel Lamb in His Bosom won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. It was the first novel by a Georgia author to win a Pulitzer, soon followed by Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind in 1937. In fact, Lamb was largely responsible for the discovery of Gone With the Wind; after reading Miller's novel, Macmillan editor Harold S. Latham sought other southern novels and authors, and found Margaret Mitchell. Caroline Miller was fascinated by the other Old South not the romantic inhabitants of Gone With the Wind, but rather the poor people of the south Georgia backwoods, who never owned a slave or planned to fight a war. The story of Cean and Lonzo, a young couple who begin their married lives two decades before the Civil War, Lamb in His Bosom is a fascinating account of social customs and material realities among settlers of the Georgia frontier. At the same time, Lamb in His Bosom transcends regional history as Miller's quietly lyrical prose style pays poignant tribute to a woman's life lived close to nature, the nature outside her and the nature within. - Publisher

The Stranger & The Meursault Investigation

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Monday, January 25, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m

In Multipurpose Room C

In "The Stranger" Meursault, a young French Algerian man shoots and kills an Arab man on the beach. The dead man is never named. Harun, the narrator of "The Meursault Investigation," claims that the dead man was Musa, his older brother. In an attempt to prove his brother's existence, Harun investigates nearly every element of Meursault's crime, finding reasons to question everything. Kamel Daoud's "The Meursault Investigation” turns Albert Camus' novel "The Stranger" inside out in a provocative, exciting and occasionally irritating way.

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