African American Authors Book Club

Meets the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 5 p.m.
At the Athens-Clarke County Library

The African American Authors Book Club is for anyone who is interested and who loves to read. The books are selected by members of the book club and are primarily books written by African American authors. Our objective is to broaden our knowledge of the many African American authors and their writings and just have fun reading.

Perfect Peace

Book cover

May 13, 2014

Perfect Peace by Daniel Black: When the seventh child of the Peace family, named Perfect, turns eight, her mother Emma Jean tells her bewildered daughter, "You was born a boy. I made you a girl. But that ain't what you was supposed to be. So, from now on, you gon' be a boy." From this point forward, his life becomes a bizarre kaleidoscope of events. Meanwhile, the Peace family is forced to question everything they thought they knew about gender, sexuality, unconditional love, and fulfillment. - Publisher

Darius Jones

Book cover

April 8, 2014

Darius Jones by Mary B. Morrison: Darius Jones is the basketball league's most valuable player. His wife and son travel with him to away games; and his relationship with his parents has never been better. He's doing well with everyone except his son's birth mother. When a drunk driver smashes into his car, his wife Fancy ends up in a coma with only a 50/50 chance of surviving--that's when the drama really begins. - Publisher

Don't play in the sun: one woman's journey through the color complex

Book cover

March 11, 2014

Don't play in the sun: one woman's journey through the color complex by Marita Golden: "Don't play in the sun. You're going to have to get a light-skinned husband for the sake of your children as it is."

In these words from her mother, novelist and memoirist Marita Golden learned as a girl that she was the wrong color. Her mother had absorbed "colorism" without thinking about it. But, as Golden shows in this provocative book, biases based on skin color persist–and so do their long-lasting repercussions.

Golden recalls deciding against a distinguished black university because she didn’t want to worry about whether she was light enough to be homecoming queen. A male friend bitterly remembers that he was teased about his girlfriend because she was too dark for him. Even now, when she attends a party full of accomplished black men and their wives, Golden wonders why those wives are all nearly white. From Halle Berry to Michael Jackson, from Nigeria to Cuba, from what she sees in the mirror to what she notices about the Grammys, Golden exposes the many facets of "colorism" and their effect on American culture. Part memoir, part cultural history, and part analysis, Don't Play in the Sun also dramatizes one accomplished black woman's inner journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance and pride. - Publisher

Jump at the Sun

Book cover

January 14, 2014

Jump at the Sun by Kim McLarin: Grace Jefferson is an educated and accomplished modern woman, a child of the Civil Rights dream, and she knows it. But after a series of rattling personal transitions, she finds herself in a new house in a new city and in a new career for which she feels dangerously unsuited: a stay-at-home mom. Caught between the only two models of mothering she has ever known--a sharecropping grandmother who abandoned her children to save herself and a mother who sacrificed all to save her kids--Grace struggles to embrace her new role, hoping to find a middle ground. But as the days pass and the pressures mount, Grace catches herself in small acts of abandonment--speeding up on neighborhood walks, closing doors with the children on one side and her on the other--that she fears may foretell a future she is powerless to prevent. Or perhaps one she secretly seeks. - Publisher

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