Last Monday Book Discussion Group

Meets the Last Monday of each month at 7 p.m.
At the Athens-Clarke County Library

The Last Monday Book Discussion Group selects our titles together usually 3 or 4 at a time. We generally like novels but have included non-fiction history and biographies.

National Poetry Month

Monday April 28, 7:00 p.m. in Multi-Purpose Room C

The Last Monday Book Discussion Group celebrates National Poetry Month. Each attendee is invited to bring 2 or 3 poems that s/he wants to talk about. Please also bring 10 copies of the poems to share with the group. All the poems can be on the same sheet(s) of paper. Criteria for selecting the poems is:

  • 2 or 3 that are your favorites OR
  • 2 or 3 that you dislike OR
  • 2 or 3 that you do not understand OR
  • 2 or 3 that you think are overrated OR
  • any combination of the above

The Thin Man

Book Cover

Monday, March 24, 7:00 p.m.

In Multipurpose Room C

The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett

Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961) and "hard-boiled" are practically synonymous -- he's been called the "father" of the rough gumshoe whose cases revolve around the unenlightened criminal element; there isn't a drawing room or criminal genius in sight in his works. As a former Pinkerton agent, Hammett knew of what he wrote, and his style, later so widely copied, is distinct -- a gritty, realistic, and none-too-favorable look at characters and settings, punctuated by vernacular dialogue. His detectives differ in personality, but all share one over-arching principle: crime shouldn't pay, and their job is to make sure it doesn't.

The Thin Man (Jan 1934) - Nick Charles searches for a wealthy inventor who is the prime suspect in a New York City murder case.

Writing Style in this title : Dialogue-rich; Spare; Witty

Winesburg, Ohio

Book Cover

Monday, February 24, 7:00 p.m.

In the Bentley Conference Room on 2nd Floor

Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson

Anderson, Sherwood, 1876-1941: Sherwood Anderson is best known for his short stories, which realistically describe small town American life in the early twentieth century. Anderson's work frequently explores the theme of disillusionment with everyday life, pitted against the quest to find success. Using everyday speech and a direct, naturalistic style, Anderson's stories deceptively employ simplicity in order to explore the complex workings of the subconscious. Anderson is hailed as one of the finest American writers of the twentieth century, and as a powerful influence for writers such as Faulkner and Hemingway.

His first novel, Windy McPherson's Son, was published in 1914. Along with his second, Marching Men, of 1917, he later commented that his first novels were raw and immature. He is best known for his classic collection of tales, Winesburg, Ohio, which he had begun writing in 1915 and generally wrote in the order the stories appear in the text. The book was published in 1919 and received much acclaim, establishing him as a talented modern American author. He espoused themes similar to the later works of T.S. Eliot and other modernists.

Winesburg, Ohio Description: Through twenty-three connected short stories, the author looks into the lives of the inhabitants of a small town in the American heartland. In a simple and intense style, these psychological portraits of the sensitive and imaginative of Winesburg's population are seen through the eyes of a young reporter-narrator, George Willard. Their stories are about loneliness and alienation, passion and virginity, wealth and poverty, thrift and profligacy, carelessness and abandon.

Contents: Tales and the persons: Book of the grotesque -- Hands-concerning Wing Biddlebaum -- Paper pills-concerning Doctor Reefy -- Mother-concerning Elizabeth Willard -- Philosopher-concerning Doctor Parcival -- Nobody knows-concerning Louise Trunnion -- Godliness (parts one and two)-concerning Jesse Bentley -- Surrender (part three)-concerning Louise Bentley -- Terror (part four)-concerning David Hardy -- Man of ideas-concerning Joe Welling -- Adventure-concerning Alice Hindman -- Respectibility-concerning Wash Williams -- Thinker-concerning Seth Richmond -- Tandy-concerning Tandy Hard -- Strength of God-concerning the Reverend Curtis Hartman -- Teacher-concerning Kate Swift -- Loneliness-concerning Enoch Robinson - Awakening-concerning Belle Carpenter -- 'Queer'-concerning Elmer Cowley.

Moby Dick

Book Cover

Monday, January 27, 7:00 p.m.

In the Bentley Conference Room on 2nd Floor

Moby Dick: or, The whale by Herman Melville: November 14 marks the 150th anniversary of Melville's salty saga of vengeance and obsession. Now a contender for the great American novel, this book was harpooned at the time of its 1851 publication by critics who found it overly long and boorish (observations no doubt still shared by countless high school students). They felt that like Ahab, the story didn't have much of a leg to stand on. The once lucrative whaling industry also was in its death throes and of little interest to readers. The book was forgotten for decades before being rediscovered in the 1920s by scholars who understood and appreciated the multilevel symbolism and allegory dismissed by their 19th-century predecessors. Melville published little after the failure of Moby-Dick and made his living as a customs inspector in New York City, where he was born in 1819 and died in complete obscurity in 1891. He is buried in the Bronx. --Michael Rogers (Reviewed November 15, 2001) (Library Journal, vol 126, issue 19, p102) From Novelist, accessed via GALILEO 27 Aug 2013.

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