Last Monday Book Discussion Group

Meets the Last Monday of each month at 7 p.m.
At the Athens-Clarke County Library

The Last Monday Book Discussion Group selects our titles together usually 3 or 4 at a time. We generally like novels but have included non-fiction history and biographies.

The Stranger & The Meursault Investigation

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Monday, January 25, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m

In Multipurpose Room C

In "The Stranger" Meursault, a young French Algerian man shoots and kills an Arab man on the beach. The dead man is never named. Harun, the narrator of "The Meursault Investigation," claims that the dead man was Musa, his older brother. In an attempt to prove his brother's existence, Harun investigates nearly every element of Meursault's crime, finding reasons to question everything. Kamel Daoud's "The Meursault Investigation” turns Albert Camus' novel "The Stranger" inside out in a provocative, exciting and occasionally irritating way.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

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Monday, November 30, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m

In Multipurpose Room C

The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera: Set mostly during the Russian invasion of Prague in the late 1960s, the novel focuses on the love lives of four Czech intellectuals as they struggle with relationships, sex, politics, and the military occupation of their country. Against a philosophical backdrop of lightness and heaviness, all four characters struggle to achieve a balance between the two opposing forces in their lives. - Publisher

No Great Mischief

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Monday, October 26, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

In Multipurpose Room C

No Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod: In a family where "the brothers still speak Gaelic to each other; legends lurk at the edge of the simplest conversation; language and music are themselves links to a heroic, defeated past," Alexander MacDonald spends a summer in the mines with his wild older brother and cares for another brother, now a dying alcoholic. - Publisher

Far From the Madding Crowd

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Monday, September 28, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

In Multipurpose Room C

Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy: There is in England no more real or typical district than Thomas Hardy's imaginary Wessex, the scattered fields and farms of which were first discovered in Far from the Madding Crowd. It is here that Gabriel Oak observes Bathsheba, the young mistress of Weatherbury Farm, fall victim to her amorous caprices. He stands by her through one marriage to a handsome, corruptly sentimental sergeant. Selflessly altruistic, he sees her through another betrothal to her compulsive, puritanical neighbor-as unaware as she of the stroke of Fate that will effect their ultimate union. Published anonymously and first attributed to George Eliot, Far from the Madding Crowd won Hardy immediate success; it combines an architecturally perfect plot with the philosophical overtones that were to set the theme for all his later works. - Publisher

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